Dial M For Murder – tour – review

Tom Chambers stars in tour of vintage crime drama ★★★

I suspect Dial M For Murder seemed more thrilling when it was first performed seventy years ago. The latest touring production, which I saw on the opening night at Richmond Theatre, doesn’t exactly have you on the edge of your seat, certainly not jumping out of it. However it still has a clever plot with a few excellent twists. And there’s considerable fun, intrigue and excitement to be had as you wonder whether the criminal will be caught and, if so, how.

Production photo from Dial M For Murder touring production showing Christopher Harper, Sally Bretton, Michael salami & Tom Chambers
Christopher Harper, Sally Bretton, Michael salami & Tom Chambers in Dial M For Murder. Photo: Manuel Harlan

This Simon Friend Entertainment production, directed by Anthony Banks, is faithful to the spirit of the original stage play by Frederick Knott on which the Alfred Hitchcock film was based. Tony Wendice, an impecunious former tennis player, plans to murder his rich wife because she has fallen in love with someone else and he doesn’t want to lose his cash cow. He recruits an old acquaintance with a need for money and a leaning towards crime. It could be the perfect murder… unless he makes a mistake.

Like top players in a tennis match

Porduction photo showing Tom Chambers in Dial M For Murder touring production
Tom Chambers in Dial M For Murder. Photo: Manuel Harlan

The set up is slow and wordy but once it gets going, especially when events cause Tony to improvise, the play becomes quite gripping- like watching a high level tennis match in which he quick wittedly returns whatever ball comes over the net.

Fortunately the production is blessed with two fine players in the lead roles. Tom Chambers as Tony is wonderfully louche with an amusing habit of striking tennis playing poses. On the other side of the net, Christopher Harper’s police inspector is a worthy opponent. He exudes authority, intelligence and determination. I particularly enjoyed his increasing animation as he believes he’s closing in on the guilty party.

The production also stars Sally Bretton and Michael Salami .

The play was written in 1951 and the clipped dialogue and repressed emotions are typical of the time. In fact, I’m not sure why director Anthony Banks has transferred the action to the more unbuttoned sixties when an affair and the planning of a murder were more shocking in that earlier decade.

Production photo of Christopher Harper in touring production of Dial M For Murder
Christopher Harper in Dial M For Murder. Photo: Manuel Harlan

The production pays homage to forties and fifties cinema. It uses chiaroscuro lighting at various times which I am assuming is intended to summon up the feel of an old detective film. I’m sorry to say I found the shadows more reminiscent of a power cut than a film noir.

On the plus side, David Woodhead’s angular set with much early Sixties detail gives a good sense of both the period and of the striking camera angles used by Alfred Hitchcock.

By the way, there’s an inadvertent spoiler in the programme’s cast list so I advise not looking at that until the interval.

If you fancy a night out, you could do a lot worse than this diverting entertainment.

Click here to watch the review on YouTube

Dial M For Murder is touring until December 2021. Booking details can be found on the tour website dialmformurderplay.com

Paul Seven Lewis was given press tickets to review this production